Ix Digest

Weekly tech dose and other fascinating insights curated by Ionixx Technologies

Top Picks

  • Blockchain Players Beat Gold and Bitcoin in the Pandemic | Bloomberg.com

    Gold and its digital counterpart, Bitcoin, have had a pretty good run among investors seeking a haven or those willing to take a punt on cryptocurrency. But they’ve been pipped in the past year by another investment thesis that’s perhaps a little more tangible, highlighting the old adage that it’s smartest to be selling shovels in a gold rush.

  • STAT Health Tech: Google’s government contract to use AI in cancer diagnosis & new data on virtual diabetes coaching | STAT Health Tech

    The U.S. Department of Defense has struck a deal with Google Cloud to use its AI tools to improve cancer diagnosis. The project will use AI to analyze pathology slides on augmented reality microscopes, and test its ability to make a difference in a clinical setting. It will be rolled out at treatment facilities operated by the Defense Health Agency and the Department of Veterans Affairs, with the hope of reducing the 12 million misdiagnoses every ye

  • Android Jetpack Compose to make app development easier, now in alpha | Slashgear

    We live in an app-centric world, not just on smartphones but also on desktops and even on TVs. We have, in other words, become dependent on these apps, as well as the services that power then remotely, and, in the final analysis, on the developers that create these experiences. Although statistically the mobile platform, Android apps haven’t exactly been the most enjoyable to develop, something that Google’s new Jetpack Compose toolkit is aiming to fix once and for all.

  • Blockchain-Based Crypto Payments Need To Focus On User Experience To Go Mainstream | Forbes

    Blockchain and blockchain-enabled payments are the future of transactions, but there are several issues that need to be resolved first. Ever since the idea of blockchain and cryptographically secured currency entered the marketplace, the benefits of widespread adoption have been discussed and analyzed at great length. Despite this engagement, however, the utilization of cryptocurrency as a legitimate fiat alternative, i.e., using crypto as money, remains something of an oddity, with only a relatively small percentage of cryptocurrencies being used as a medium of exchange.

  • The story of how web browsers changed us forever | The Next Web

    One day, Internet Explorer was nearly the only game in town, powering 96% of website visits at its peak in 2002. Then, quickly it turned into the app you only used to download Firefox or Chrome, or so the joke went. And then Internet Explorer died and turned into Chrome. From creating an industry to lawsuits over monopolizing said industry in under a decade may be a record. But that’s the web. Everything moves faster online, from the dot-com boom and bust to today’s smartphone-powered world.

  • Outdated Website Design Trends/Practices: What 2020 Taught Us | Digital Information World

    We are only halfway through 2020 and there are several web design trends and practices that were popular just a few months ago that now appear outdated. This is due in part to the fact that every few months our mobile devices and mobile technology improves. Something that was considered a good interface just a few months ago now seems outdated. As technology keeps moving forward, website design needs to continue to improve. Web designers are constantly looking at the websites they create from a UI and UX point of view. They are finding that a lot of the design aspects that were popular just a year ago or even a few months ago are outdated and useless. Here is what 2020 has taught us so far about web design practices and trends.

  • Blockchain technology will remove barriers to instant international settlement | Banking Drive

    Barriers are springing up everywhere for remittance companies and banks. Overcoming obstacles to cross-border payments is especially daunting right now, with slow settlement times, high fees and fresh competition bringing new challenges. Participants on a next-generation network can transact and have the transaction visible and settled between parties in minutes or even seconds instead of days, writes Haohan Xu, the CEO of Apifiny.

  • Successful cybersecurity needs good user experience | Technical.ly

    Cybersecurity is typically framed as too technical for user experience. It is, after all, commonly designed by engineers who know what they are doing for engineers that know what they are doing. But isn’t that exactly the thinking that led to the accident at Three Mile Island? When it comes to cybersecurity, you can have the best product on the market, but if it’s not easy to use in the way the user is trying to use it, you are more likely to confuse and frustrate your target users and ultimately lead to a false set of security. The article highlights the three questions any company should consider when developing a software product.

    s
  • The hidden trackers in your phone, explained | Vox

    You probably know that the apps on your phone report back tons of data about you to advertisers. Even developers may not know (or care) when and how their users’ privacy is being invaded.Companies want to put their SDKs in as many apps as possible in order to collect as much information from as many people as possible.This article takes a deep dive into why apps include so many software development kits, or SDKS, that hoover up your personal info.

  • Why you shouldn’t overlook user testing methods in UX design | The Next Web

    The fundamental purpose of user testing is to better understand and empathize with the core users of a digital product. Unfortunately, user testing is often an afterthought. From card sorting to usability studies, user testing methods utilized in UX design are developed to include the user in the decision-making process. However, many projects are with only stakeholder feedback of a prototype.

  • Bye Fintech. Hello Techfin. | Forbes

    There’s a very interesting discussion to be had about whether the changes induced by the COVID-19 crisis are short- or long-term and to what extent those changes are an acceleration of existing trends (as I think they are, largely) or new directions for the sector. The author predicts that we are leaving the fintech era and entering the open banking era. Visa V’s multi-billion purchase of Plaid and Mastercard MA’s purchase of Fincity, the pandemic has accelerated the transition between the eras. FinTech will not vanish, but innovate and operate in a completely different way.

  • Unforgettable: How Blockchain Will Fundamentally Change the Human Experience | Coindesk

    From the invention of the wheel to the printing press, new technology has changed the human experience. Our comprehension of the world is no longer limited to a village. Our collective knowledge grows by inconceivable exabytes of data every day. And our memories, our very recollections of the events that shape our lives, are changing too.In fact, according to neurobiologist Dr. James L. McGaugh, a researcher specializing in learning and memory, technological advancements right up to the advent of the internet have made it less necessary for humans to construct lasting records of our own memories.

  • Circular Design According to IDEO | UX Planet

    Circular Design is a way to apply the concept of a circular economy, stemming from different currents of thought including regenerative design. Traditionally, the economy has followed a linear model: making, producing, consuming, throwing (“take, make, consume, dispose”). This situation leads to ecological problems (overexploitation of natural resources, waste, rejection of materials toxic to the environment). Hence the solution of the circular economy, which requires a new way of thinking about design.

  • How ‘Sustainable’ Web Design Can Help Fight Climate Change | Wired

    Danny Van Kooten, a Dutch programmer decided to reduce his carbon output by no longer eating beef or flying. Then, five months ago, he made a change that had an even bigger impact—and it took only a few keystrokes. Read on the link to know Van Kooten's aha moment that is popularly being shared by web designers around the planet. They call it “sustainable” software design, and it's propelled by technologists measuring the energy budget of nearly every swipe and click in our information ecosystem.

  • Microsoft releases a beta version of its decentralized identity tool on the Bitcoin blockchain | The Block Crypto

    Microsoft's decentralized identity tool, called ION, is moving to the Bitcoin mainnet for a public beta test, according to an announcement from Microsoft. Decentralized identity tools enable greater ownership over one's digital identity credentials by creating unique identifiers that are cryptographically verifiable.

  • How To Test A Design Concept For Effectiveness | Smashing Magazine

    Getting a client or stakeholder to approve a design concept can be challenging. However, testing can make it easier, as well as ensuring you have the right solution. Most of us are reasonably comfortable with the idea of carrying out usability testing on a website or prototype. We don’t always get the opportunity, but most people accept that it is a good idea. And,when it comes to a design concept, opinion is more divided. Some designers feel it undermines their role, a view that seems to be somewhat backed up by the famous “Forty Shades of Blue” episode, where Google tested which one of forty shades of blue to use for link color.

  • Application threats and security trends you need to know about | Help Net Security

    Applications are a gateway to valuable data, so it’s no wonder they are one of attackers’ preferred targets. And since modern applications aren’t a monolithic whole but consist of many separate components “glued together” over networks, attackers have at their disposal many “doors” through which they can attempt access to the data. Some of these doors are more popular than others, and it is best to be aware of these easy targets.

  • Reddit is testing Community Points, a blockchain based system to encourage on platform engagement | Digital Information World

    Social media platforms have not yet been able to integrate blockchain-based technology in their operations in any practical way. Facebook is working on its Libra Project, while Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is seen to be a significant advocate for cryptocurrencies. However, it seems that Reddit has found a way to use this technology. This week, the platform announced the launch of the new ‘Community Points,’ a blockchain-based system, rolled out as a test and will enable Reddit moderators to assign scores to Reddit community members. The points will be allocated to members based on their engagement within their respective subreddits

  • A new normal for design | Abstract.com

    As remote design sprints, AMAs and webinars have become the norm, we’re getting more under-the-hood peeks at folks’ remote work setups, virtual brainstorms, design systems, and more. While not everyone has the time or energy to increase their outputs, there’s a realness to the conversations happening around systems, processes, career advancement and development, and why our default understanding of collaboration is critically flawed in a remote-first world.

  • Attention app developers: Android is no longer second fiddle | Developer - Tech.com

    For a long time the app world was the iOS user’s oyster – all of the best apps were designed for them. In fact, within the US, smartphones and the apps market were essentially synonymous with the iPhone and the App Store. Throughout the rest of the world users preferred Androids, and by 2015 they accounted for 80% of smartphone shipments. It was only a matter of time before this sleeping giant awakened here on our shores. There are lots of reasons to assume that Android will no longer play second fiddle to the iPhone. This has the potential to shake things up in the entire mobile market.

  • Bank as a service - the future of banks and fintech startups? | The Payers

    Over half of Americans are refusing to use some products or services due to personal privacy concerns, according to survey results published on April 14, 2020 by Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan American think tank based in Washington. In light of this research you would think that we would see Facebook and Google reporting large losses in their subscriber base, but we don’t. Why? It's commonly referred to as the ‘privacy paradox’, as John Naughton wrote in The Guardian, ‘a dark shadow looms over our networked world. It’s called the privacy paradox’.

  • Scaling agile and DevOps for digital transformation | CIO

    Many organizations see a move to agile software development and then to DevOps as key steps in their digital transformation journeys. But in many cases, these transitions are tackled by smaller teams, thereby limiting the overall impact they can have. Rolling out these practices more broadly throughout the organization can pay significant dividends by revamping processes on a grander scale. But making that leap is challenging.

  • Solving the privacy paradox with blockchain tech | The Payers

    Over half of Americans are refusing to use some products or services due to personal privacy concerns, according to survey results published on April 14, 2020 by Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan American think tank based in Washington. In light of this research you would think that we would see Facebook and Google reporting large losses in their subscriber base, but we don’t. Why? It's commonly referred to as the ‘privacy paradox’, as John Naughton wrote in The Guardian, ‘a dark shadow looms over our networked world. It’s called the privacy paradox’.

  • Bad UX Design Always Leads to Compromised Security | Info Security

    According to Jared Spool; writer, researcher, and founding principal of User Interface Engineering, “If it’s not usable, it’s not secure.” That is, if you put protections in place on your website and app, but it’s not intuitive to the user (like a randomly generated password they must remember), it will indubitably become insecure. A great example: Kanye’s infamous all-zero passcode to unlock his smartphone device. The passcode system isn’t usable so customers resort to shortcuts, therefore, it’s not secure.

  • The coronavirus crisis is fintech’s biggest test yet—and greatest opportunity to go mainstream | Fortune

    As the novel coronavirus presents the world with its biggest economic challenge in more than a decade, fintech is having a moment of truth. Companies like SoFi, Robinhood, Chime, and others were built on promises of providing consumers and businesses with easier access to money in all its forms—investments, credit, person-to-person payments—via the Internet, and often without dealing with a brick-and-mortar bank. With the global economy largely on pause, millions of people abruptly out of work, and thousands of bank branches shuttered, the time for fintech to deliver on those promises has arrived.

  • 10 Things Every Blockchain Engineer Should Know in 2020 | Coin Telegraph

    Blockchain is no longer just the backbone of Bitcoin (BTC) or cryptocurrencies. It is more than that. Its application in various industries is as wide as the seas. And despite the technology’s limitations and challenges, demand for blockchain engineers increased by more than 500% between 2018 and 2019. Many engineers are wanting to jump on the blockchain bandwagon. Blockchain engineers can have a head start or stay relevant if they know these 10 aspects of the industry. Maybe not all of them. But the more they know, the better.

  • Here’s when you can trust Zoom, and when you shouldn’t | Fast Company

    In the midst of global pandemic, the nine-year-old videoconferencing service Zoom skyrocketed into general awareness. “To zoom” is now a verb. But among its rise in stock and a twentyfold increase in usage between December 2019 and March 2020, with 200 million daily users now conducting meetings worldwide, a lot of other verbs have been used with less affection about the company’s software quality, installation methods, security, ties to China, and privacy policies and actions.

  • Baking Structured Data Into The Design Process | Smashing Magazine

    Search engine optimization (SEO) is essential for almost every kind of website, but its finer points remain something of a specialty. Even today SEO is often treated as something that can be tacked on after the fact. It can up to a point, but it really shouldn’t be. Search engines get smarter every day and there are ways for websites to be smarter too.

  • Happy developers write secure code, report claims | Computer Weekly

    Developers who are happy and satisfied in their work are 3.6 times less likely to neglect security considerations in their code, 2.3 times more likely to have automated security tools in place, and 1.3 times more likely to follow open source security best practice, according to new research conducted on behalf of DevOps services supplier Sonatype.

  • Above the fold: a visual history of the internet | Wallpaper

    Regarded as the ‘biggest thing to happen since the industrial revolution’, the web has changed the world. Here, we look to Taschen’s Web Design: The evolution of the digital world 1990 – today to celebrate the moments, sites and people who have made the biggest impact in its 30-year history.

  • What is human-centered design? A product framework that embraces empathy | CIO

    Human-centered design (HCD) is a design framework for creating products, services, hardware and software that are built to meet the specific needs of clients, users or customers. HCD is typically used in technology when developing products or services that are intended to alleviate problems or issues, especially when those problems are health-related.

  • Accessibility Of Design: Designing For Every Experience | Forbes

    Amazon and airport vendor OTG announced on Wednesday that Amazon’s technology would be installed in several CIBO Express stores at Newark Liberty and LaGuardia airports. This news comes two days after Amazon announced that it had begun selling its so-called “just walk out” technology — which combines ceiling cameras, computer vision, and weight sensors — to other retailers, in a move that could someday impact the millions of Americans who hold cashier jobs today.

  • Delivery Technology Is Keeping Chinese Cities Afloat Through Coronavirus | HBR.org

    Amazon and airport vendor OTG announced on Wednesday that Amazon’s technology would be installed in several CIBO Express stores at Newark Liberty and LaGuardia airports. This news comes two days after Amazon announced that it had begun selling its so-called “just walk out” technology — which combines ceiling cameras, computer vision, and weight sensors — to other retailers, in a move that could someday impact the millions of Americans who hold cashier jobs today.

  • What Does A Foldable Web Actually Mean? | Smashing Magazine

    Foldable devices have brought with them talk of a ‘foldable web,’ and the idea that long-standing web conventions may be on the verge of a serious shakeup. Is it all hype, or is it time to get flexible?

  • Welcome to Botnet, Where Everyone’s an Influencer | Wired Tech

    Ever wondered what it's like to be a celebrity on the internet? You can find out for yourself with Botnet—a social media platform filled with bots ready to shower you in adoration. Simply post a selfie or an update on your life, and watch the likes and comments roll in. The idea is to simulate mega-fame on the internet, except without the trolls—if you want to be abused, you'll have to pay 99 cents.

  • Seven UX/UI Design Trends For Mobile Apps To Look Out For In 2020 | Forbes

    With or without 5G, we are going to see apps that are lighter by design and more flexible. Elements that are more data-intensive, such as immersive imagery, can be stored on a server, while the lighter elements can be stored locally on a phone or other device. Going into 2020, the changes with app design will be both philosophical and technological. You'll need to plan accordingly so your business can take advantage of the changing tide.

  • Still testing like its 1999? | SD Times

    Over the last 20 years, we have seen massive changes to how we design, develop, and deploy applications; from monolithic applications to microservices, desktop applications and static web applications to highly interactive web and mobile applications. The changes happened incrementally but the cumulative impact has been dramatic.

  • Is Neumorphism really 2020's hottest design trend? | Creative Bloq

    Everybody's talking about Neumorphism, a hot new design trend that's appeared out of nowhere over the past couple of months – but is it really all that? Designers love a good trend, and there's much about Neumorphism that suggests this could be a big one (people are already talking about it as a potential look for iOS 14) rather than an exercise in experimental design.

  • Blockchain for the Environment: It Is Real and It Is Here | Coin Telegraph

    Every week sears a new image of climate change into our collective consciousness. A few decades ago, we heard about ozone holes and ice melting at slightly higher rates than anticipated. Today, the reminders of climate change are more visceral and immediate: California’s hills and forests burn, Venice’s city council chamber floods, and Iceland holds a funeral for a glacier.

  • Can Blockchain Survive Mass Adoption? Future Perils Disclosed | Coin Telegraph

    Prediction can be a bit of a gamble. And when cryptocurrency and blockchain are involved, it wouldn’t be surprising to see people shying away from scrying experiments of any sort. Blockchain gets a bad rep because of its relation to Bitcoin (BTC), the cryptocurrency that many love to hate due to its apparently volatile value.

  • What’s next for serverless architecture? | InfoWorld

    Serverless services are everywhere. The driving force behind an evolution towards a new way of programming, serverless offerings come in all forms and shapes including application hosting platforms, serverless databases, CDNs, security offerings, etc. Automatic distribution of logic and data to the edge will bring minimal latency to end users, without provisioning, scaling, or configuration worries for developers.

  • The Scroll subscription service is an ingenious web technology hack | The Verge

    Scroll, a new $5 per month subscription service that gives you a bunch of websites without ads. I kept on experiencing successive waves of small revelations when I thought about it. I’ll disclose now that Vox Media (and therefore The Verge) are partners, but I had no idea this service existed until it was announced yesterday.

  • The CIA’s Infamous, Unsolved Cryptographic Puzzle Gets a ‘Final Clue’ | Vice.com

    Almost exactly 30 years ago, the artist and sculptor Jim Sanborn was devising an encrypted code for his sculpture complex at the new CIA headquarters. The centerpiece of the complex, called Kryptos, is an eight-foot-tall sculpture of a copper scroll, with four paragraphs of letters cut from the metal. At first glance, the letters seem to be gibberish. But cryptologists, including NSA experts and the American scientist James Gillogly, gradually decrypted the first three paragraphs of the text. But the full solution has eluded cryptographers, and the 74-year-old Sanborn has just released a new clue in order to help hobbyists solve it.

  • A brief history of UX design and its evolution | The Next Web

    When you think about user experience design it’s a term we instantly associate with apps and websites. And especially when considering a typical job description of a UX designer, it can trick you into thinking that it’s a modern concept. The term was first coined in 1993 by the cognitive psychologist and designer Don Norman when he worked at Apple Computer — but the UX field is older than the term.

  • Google’s ads just look like search results now | The Verge

    Last week, Google began rolling out a new look for its search results on desktop, which blurs the line between organic search results and the ads that sit above them. In what appears to be something of a purposeful dark pattern, the only thing differentiating ads and search results is a small black-and-white “Ad” icon next to the former. It’s been formatted to resemble the new favicons that now appear next to the search results you care about. Early data collected by Digiday suggests that the changes may already be causing people to click on more ads.

  • 2030: from technology optimism to technology realism | WEForum.org

    Today’s technological revolution is a time of enormous promise, but also new challenges. As we enter the 2020s it is clear that we are far from unlocking the potential of technology for our toughest challenges. We are entering a new era where powerful Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) are being infused at exponential speed into the world around us. As organizations and countries race to harness these new technologies to spur growth and competitiveness, we stand at a critical juncture to put these technologies to work in a responsible way for people and the planet.

  • Everything We Know About the Jeff Bezos Phone Hack | Wired

    In May of 2018, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos received an unexpected text on WhatsApp from Saudi Arabian leader Mohammed bin Salman: a video file that reportedly extolled Saudi Arabia’s economy. But what Bezos didn't know was that the video file was loaded with malware. According to the UN’s findings, the Saudi regime began exfiltrating large amounts of data from the phone within hours of sending the tainted MP4 video file. The attack raises questions about others who communicate with the crown prince—like President Donald Trump, who is known for using personal, consumer-grade smartphones.

  • The 3 biggest design trends at CES 2020 | Fast Company

    Every January, the annual Consumer Electronics Show snaps the tech press out of its holiday stupor to fly to Las Vegas and walk through aisle after aisle of new televisions, robots, and plain old weird gadgets that are all billed as the next big thing. Here’s what happened at the biggest product show of the year that you actually need to know about.

  • The next decade of design will be about fixing the last century of excess | Fast Company

    The 1980s have gone down in history as the decade of excess (as if the gas-guzzling V8 cars of the 1970s or the rise of fast fashion in the 1990s never happened). But the 2010s have put it all to shame. This was the decade where convenience crushed everything else. Prime two-day shipping became not a luxury, but a way of life—that would give way to one-day shipping, then same-day shipping.

  • Will 2020 be the year blockchain overcomes its hype? | World Economic Forum

    Another year has rolled on by, and while many things in the blockchain space have changed, a lot remains the same. 2019 saw a continued cooling of indiscriminate funding and a renewed focus on quality over hype. At the World Economic Forum, while they ensure that there will be greater blockchain adoption, which may deem inevitable, occurring in ways that support inclusion and avoid replicating the consolidation of power that currently exists, particularly in the financial system.

  • These design trends ruled the 2010s. It’s time to let them go | Fast Company

    Banks, other tech companies, and national governments—most notably, China’s—are readying digital currency pilots of their own; Facebook’s Libra stumbles might ease the path for those that come later, or at least force regulators to clarify what they’ll allow. Libra itself, meanwhile, promises to course-correct based on the (often scorching) feedback it has received. How will Libra, or any new currency, satisfy global regulators? What will it look like in its final form? Will Libra be the first globally viable, price-stable e‑cash? Or will someone else beat the association to it? Fortune explores these questions and canvasses the financial and digital worlds for this account.

  • Apple Has Secret Team Working on Satellites to Beam Data to Devices | Bloomberg

    Apple Inc. has a secret team working on satellite technology that the iPhone maker could use to beam internet services directly to devices, bypassing wireless networks, according to people familiar with the work. The Cupertino, California-based iPhone maker has about a dozen engineers from the aerospace, satellite and antenna design industries working on the project with the goal of deploying their results within five years, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing internal company efforts.

  • Why Facebook’s Libra Hangs in Limbo—and What’s Next in the Digital Currency Race | Fortune

    Banks, other tech companies, and national governments—most notably, China’s—are readying digital currency pilots of their own; Facebook’s Libra stumbles might ease the path for those that come later, or at least force regulators to clarify what they’ll allow. Libra itself, meanwhile, promises to course-correct based on the (often scorching) feedback it has received. How will Libra, or any new currency, satisfy global regulators? What will it look like in its final form? Will Libra be the first globally viable, price-stable e‑cash? Or will someone else beat the association to it? Fortune explores these questions and canvasses the financial and digital worlds for this account.

  • What Happens After Prisoners Learn to Code? | The Atlantic

    A very 2019 fairytale - Slack, one of Silicon Valley’s more diverse companies, has hired three formerly incarcerated coders.

  • State of the Art Industry - Results from Design Census 2019 | Design Census

    Curious about your fellow designers? Read up on the results of the 2019 state-of-the-industry Design Census, made in collaboration with AIGA Eye on Design. Understanding the state of design and the people who make it. Explore the results of this year’s survey, available as raw data and data visualizations by visiting the link.

  • Jack Dorsey Wants to Help You Create Your Own Twitter | WIRED

    Twitter has formed a new engineering team dedicated to building a new decentralized social media system. The CEO tweeted that he's hiring a team to develop open source standards for decentralized social networks. His hope: It will spawn better ways to combat hate and harassment.

  • How To Win With A Design Focused Strategy | CNET

    As described in my earlier article on What It Takes To Accelerate Through A Strategic Inflection Point, if there is a change in your situation or your ambitions, you need to jump-shift your strategy, organization and operations altogether, all at the same time. There are four primary areas of strategic focus: design, produce, deliver, and service. The choice of which of those areas on which to focus dictates your organizational and operational choices.

  • Why it’s time to start talking about blockchain ethics | MIT Technolgy Review

    If blockchain technology can be reasonably expected to make a significant difference in society, then it deserves its own field of ethics, just like biotechnology, artificial intelligence, and nuclear technology, argues Rhys Lindmark, head of community and long-term societal impact at MIT’s Digital Currency Initiative.

  • The Environmental Benefits of Digital Design | MIT Sloan Review

    Digital advances in product design are creating new opportunities to boost both environmental sustainability and profit margins. By making product development more design- and information-intensive, companies are creating a new generation of digitally enhanced offerings that are reducing material use, lowering energy demands, and increasing revenues.

  • From AirPower to Zune, a decade of Tech in review | CNET

    The Apple iPad Mini, Mac Mini, MacBook Air, Mac Pro and iPod were on our endangered list for years before Apple surprised us with upgrades to all. On the other hand, the company's AirPort router line and Time Capsule backup drive also were on a long death watch until they finally landed on Apple's vintage and obsolete product list this year.

  • Design may be the next entrepreneurial gold rush | TechCrunch

    Ten years ago, the vast majority of designers were working in Adobe Photoshop, a powerful tool with fine-tuned controls for almost every kind of image manipulation one could imagine. But it was a tool built for an analog world focused on photos, flyers and print magazines; there were no collaborative features, and much more importantly for designers, there were no other options. Since then, a handful of major players have stepped up to dominate the market alongside the behemoth, including InVision, Sketch, Figma and Canva.

  • 16 of Google's best dev and design tools in 2020 | Creative Bloq

    Working on the web usually means you will be working with Google in some shape or form. And seeing as Google Chrome is streets ahead of the competition, designers and developers need to think about how their project will work with the browser. How will it look? What technologies does it support, how secure is it and how will it perform?

  • A debate between AI experts shows a battle over the technology’s future | MIT Review

    Since the 1950s, artificial intelligence has repeatedly overpromised and under delivered. While recent years have seen incredible leaps thanks to deep learning, AI today is still narrow: it’s fragile in the face of attacks, can’t generalize to adapt to changing environments, and is riddled with bias. All these challenges make the technology difficult to trust and limit its potential to benefit society.

  • This Unstable Moment Is a Chance for Crypto to Go Mainstream | Coindesk.com

    Amazon and airport vendor OTG announced on Wednesday that Amazon’s technology would be installed in several CIBO Express stores at Newark Liberty and LaGuardia airports. This news comes two days after Amazon announced that it had begun selling its so-called “just walk out” technology — which combines ceiling cameras, computer vision, and weight sensors — to other retailers, in a move that could someday impact the millions of Americans who hold cashier jobs today.

  • AI for software development is already here | AI News

    Another week, another round of Crypto Tidbits. The past seven days were rather painful for Bitcoin (BTC), with the leading cryptocurrency tumbling by some 4% according to Coin360. Altcoins have posted similar losses. As of the time of writing this, BTC is trading for $8,500, seemingly poised to break down further as bulls fail to step in.

  • The most important cloud advances of the decade | Tech Republic

    Cloud computing has been perhaps the most transformative technology in the past several years and has changed the nature of how organizations work. Although cloud took root before 2010, the technology gained serious momentum in the 2010s, as evidenced by the number of offerings and companies that started moving some workloads off-premises— followed by most or all of their businesses.

  • Crypto Tidbits: RBC May Embrace Bitcoin, China Bashes Cryptocurrency, Ethereum DeFi Booming | News BTC

    Another week, another round of Crypto Tidbits. The past seven days were rather painful for Bitcoin (BTC), with the leading cryptocurrency tumbling by some 4% according to Coin360. Altcoins have posted similar losses. As of the time of writing this, BTC is trading for $8,500, seemingly poised to break down further as bulls fail to step in.

  • Why Millennials Trust Cryptocurrency More Than The Stock Market | Finsmes.com

    Millennials are the best hunters the world has ever seen. Do you realize how many entire industries they’ve been killing? Business Insider even wrote a piece where the headline said Millennials are killing “countless” industries — and then went on to list 19 of them. A few of the biggest are Real Estate, department stores, and the billion-dollar cereal industry. Well, it may be time to add another industry to the list: the stock market. Yes, millennials, may be gearing up to kill Wall Street. But why? And how? The article goes through a list of 5 reasons Wall Street may soon become Broke Street — and how cryptocurrencies may be the reason.

  • Q&A: Dark Design — the good, the bad and the very attractive | Digital Journal

    Dark pattern design is becoming more common, influencing the user experience promoted by many companies. Bhav Chohan explains the good and bad points about this approach, plus some notorious examples of UX. “Dark pattern design” is the practice of using software design to influence the behavior of users. The practice is becoming so large that the U.S. Senate is planning to pass a bill to control its use, which can lead to addiction in some extreme cases.

  • We Teach A.I. Systems Everything, Including Our Biases | New York Times

    Researchers say computer systems are learning from lots and lots of digitized books and news articles that could bake old attitudes into new technology. Last fall, Google unveiled a breakthrough artificial intelligence technology called BERT that changed the way scientists build systems that learn how people write and talk. But BERT, which is now being deployed in services like Google’s internet search engine, has a problem: It could be picking up on biases in the way a child mimics the bad behavior of his parents.

  • How Progressive Apps are changing businesses | Business.com

    Technology progresses quickly, and now there is a new way to engage with your website visitors in a more effective and engaging way, which is through the use of progressive web apps. First announced by Google four years ago, the format has already been adopted by many big brands, including Twitter, Forbes, and Housing.com. However, thanks to the maturity of the tech required for their creation, PWAs are now becoming accessible to all, including small businesses – even those who could not have afforded to have their own app developed from scratch, which is a big part of their appeal.